Tuesday, 11 June 2019

Florence Nightingale BIOGRAPHY || Nursing, & Facts Life HISTORY

Nursing, & Facts Florence Nightingale BIOGRAPHY

Florence Nightingale: Florence Nightingale is known as the founder of modern nursing and one of the most famous women in history, few people know that she spent the last half of her life confined to her home and often bedridden, Buffering from an illness similar to what we now call ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). 

Florence Nightingale: She was born on May 12, 1820, to wealthy British parents traveling in Italy. Named for the city which in she was born, youthful Florence never entirely fit the form of a Victorian woman. She was accomplished in writing, music, drawing and the local arts. A woman of her social standing was expected to marry and devote her life to her family, entertaining, and cultural pursuits. However, she felt an early calling to serve and declined to marry.

florence nightingale death,  florence nightingale family,  florence nightingale accomplishments,  where was florence nightingale born  florence nightingale crimean war  florence nightingale theory  florence nightingale syndrome  where did florence nightingale live


When she attempted to go to work as a nurse, her horrified family repeatedly opposed her. In those days, medical clinics were frequently grimy and dull and attendants were untrained, at times plastered women. Finally, at the age of 33, she was able to obtain some minimal training and begin her career. 

In 1854, the British press started detailing that warriors injured in the Crimean War were as a rule ineffectively thought about in woeful conditions. Songbird enlisted and prepared a gathering of medical caretakers and headed out to Turkey to help. Her landing was not celebrated by the specialists there, who hated the obstruction of a woman. 

Undaunted, she worked tirelessly to improve conditions in the hospital. Her changes upset British military therapeutic consideration, expanding benchmarks for sanitation and sustenance and significantly bringing down death rates. 

While visiting the cutting edges, she turned out to be sick and never truly recovered. Although an invalid for the rest of her life, Nightingale continued to have an influence on standards of nursing care and training. In 1859, she built up the main Visiting Nurse Association and in 1860, she set up a school that turned into a model for present-day medical attendants training. 

She was considered an expert on the scientific care of the sick and was asked by the United States for her advice on caring for the wounded soldiers of the Civil War. Through correspondence and reports, she proceeded with her impact all through her last years. She was the main lady to get the British Order of Merit.

God had always led her. She remembered no particular sermon or circumstances whichever made any great impression upon her. But the first idea she could recollect when she was a child was a desire to nurse the sick. Her daydreams were all of the hospitals and she visited them whenever she could. She never communicated about it to anyone, as she knew it would have been laughed at. She thought that God had called her to serve Him in that way.

 In 1907, the International Conference of Red Cross Societies listed her as a pioneer of the Red Cross Movement.

 Florence Nightingale died at her home, 10 South Street, in London, on Saturday, August 13, 1910. News of her death spread quickly throughout England and across the oceans to the other countries of the world. Her courage and devotion had not been forgotten. 

Florence Nightingale was known by the British fighters in the Crimea as the "woman with the light" due to the late hours that she worked watching out for the wiped out and injured. Today, she is remembered as a symbol of selfless caring and tireless service.

Ernest Hemingway Biography